The new name of SciPlore MindMapping is… “Docear”

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One month ago we asked our users to send us suggestions for a

new name for SciPlore MindMapping. We got a few dozens of ideas and would like to thank all the participants very very much for their great and creative ideas! In our team, we had lots of discussion about the pros and cons of all the names. Eventually, we decided that “Docear” was the best idea. Why? Well, it`s short (six letters/two syllables), the first letter lies quite early in the alphabet, “Docear” is easy to type on a keyboard, we believe the name is quite easy to remember, and, most importantly, we like the meaning: “Docear” pronounces the same way as “Dog-ear” which means kind of a “bookmark” (in German: Eselsohr) and includes the abbreviation for document (doc) which both represents what the software is all about (managing documents). Also, “docear” is the is the first person, singular, present subjunctive, passive from the Latin “docere” meaning “to teach”, which is also not too bad as a meaning for the software.

What do you think about that name?

More information about the new Docear will come soon (a month or two). Meanwhile, if you like, help us creating a logo and web design. Just Send us your drafts to “feedback @sciplore .org”.

By |2018-03-12T09:54:04+00:00April 10th, 2011|sciplore mindmapping, software|1 Comment

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  1. Trish February 21, 2012 at 06:11 - Reply

    Hi Mario
    I guess this is of no help! And too late. But you asked, so I assume you want to know.
    Name is short, yes.
    Clever, yes (but perhaps too clever – when I first saw the name I thought, what the hell? — you wonder where the ears come into it, as eyes rather than ears are naturally associated with documents (confusion of sight and hearing). Yes, I ‘hear’ you about the dog-ears, but since any book lover will tell you they should be discouraged (except on doggies!) So you don’t get any brownie points from me for being clever about dog-ears.
    Pronunciation – not good. Unless you know in advance HOW to say it, you trip over how to say it. I assumed it was probably dose-ear (like eardrops) — so it doesn’t even remind me of the Latin (which is, as you say, clever — but only if it isn’t strained).
    So — I think it isa trying too hard to be clever, which means that when it flops, it belly-flops.

    PS — brilliant what you are doing otherwise!

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